South Korean and New York based designer Jay Sae Jung Oh has sent me images of her work – quite spectacular. Have a look at these pieces all wrapped in vetegable fiber and rope – they blur the frontier between art and design.

Savage Chair – Jute (Plant Fiber), Plastic Objects – 56” x 44” x 42”

Manufactured objects conspicuously transform into unexpected new forms, making a strong statement about our current cultural condition of abundance. Sharp attention is focused on reconsideration of the ordinary. In this project, I started to collect discarded plastic objects, assembled them together, and wrapped them with a natural material. The transformation occurs in the amalgamated form and the concealment of this form. Innovation, invention, and beauty can emerge from anywhere, even the most familiar, ordinary and everyday.

Savage Chair – details

Savage Chair – details

Jute Side Table – Jute(Plant Fiber), 12 mundane plastic objects – 21″x 20.5″x 21″

It is composed of 12 manufactured plastic objects (such as broken baby chair, tray, cup, toys.. etc. ) which are combined and used as one coherent product in itself. The assembled pieces are wrapped together by jute, a soft shiny vegetable fiber that can be spun into a coarse and robust thread, which is mainly used to make cloth and rope, with patterns. On the very top, there are trays, a bowl and a cup that serves as a functional tabletop. All in which communicate the resurrection of these discarded objects into its second life.

Rope Lighting – Hemp Rope, Copper Pipe

Examining the unique material and textural qualities of hemp rope, the design of Rope Light offers an opportunity to engage and interact with the material in a new way. The light can be shaped and bent as desired.

Jute Coat Hangers – 20″x 42″x 9″

Welded together with a natural wrap called jute, I’m redefining the familiar gesture of hanging coats. The radial pattern is posted on the wall in a vertical orientation to create a chandelier of hooks to act as a coat hanger/rack. This design emerged from the changing of the interaction point.

Photos © Jay Sae Jung Oh

Thanks Tim !

+ Via Jay Sae Jung Oh